Skip to main content

We are now open on a limited basis. Click here to see our enhanced safety protocols and procedures . We have taken important measures to continue seeing patients at this time.

Home »

Uncategorized

Computer learning and vision problems

Unfortunately because of COVID-19, we’re seeing a lot of our kids spend an enormous amount of time in front of a computer.

This has bad consequences not just for adults that have eye fatigue and strain, but especially in younger children who are still developing their vision. Our visual system needs to be actively involved in using all our space. Not just our close distances like reading and computers, but also moving outside in an infinite space setting like a playground.

Our visual system uses being outdoors to kind of recalibrate, and have good functional focusing ability. Studies show that children who are indoors a lot like in China tend to have higher degrees of myopia or nearsightedness.

The ability to be outside, to play, and have sports is very important for the visual system.

Here are a couple of things we can recommend for your child or young adult that might be spending a lot of time in front of the screen.

First of all, I would suggest the 20-20-20 rule.

Every 20 minutes, look away from the screen, hopefully, 20 feet or more.

Looking outside a window is ideal. Relax your eyes for about 20 seconds. This will be a visual break. If your teacher doesn’t like it, tell them your eye doctor is recommending this. You can still listen to what your teacher is saying, however, you should relax your focus periodically.

Also, make sure that when you are reading or writing that you are no closer than the Harmon distance. The Harmon distance is between knuckle and elbow. If you see your child getting closer and closer to their work, check their Harmon distance and move them back. This is very effective when dealing with younger children. I did this with my daughter when she was 4, and she would check her Harmon distance by putting her elbow on the desk and backing her head up to her knuckles. If you see the children are still doing this a lot, have them checked by a developmental optometrist because, very often, a low plus lens can help the child relax their focus.

You can also make sure that if your child is experiencing eye pain, strain, discomfort, double vision or blur, that you get them in to see their developmental optometrist. We can prescribe glasses for their best comfort at near. We want to preserve our vision & our children’s vision & keep our nation strong despite this pandemic.

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Astigmatism, Pink Eye or conjunctivitis Myopia or Nearsightedness , Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Oklahoma City eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

Book an eye exam at Eyecare Boulevard eye clinic near you in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma to learn more about your candidacy for contact lenses and which type is right for you. Call 405-369-4855

Eyecare Boulevard, your Oklahoma City eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

FOLLOW US

    • My child had a vision exam at my Paediatrician, why do I need to come to the eye doctor?

      Vision screening programs are intended to help identify children or adults who may have undetected vision problems and refer them for further evaluation. However, they can’t be relied on to provide the same results as a comprehensive eye and vision examination. Vision screening programs are intended to help identify children or adults who may have undetected vision problems and refer them for further evaluation. Screenings can take many forms. Often schools provide periodic vision screenings for their students. A pediatrician or other primary care physician may do a vision screening as part of a school physical. When applying for a driver’s license, chances are your vision will be screened. Many times vision screenings are part of local health fairs put on by hospitals, social service agencies or fraternal groups like the Lions and Elks Clubs. While vision screenings can uncover some individuals with vision problems, they can miss more than they find. This is a major concern about vision screening programs. Current vision screening methods cannot be relied upon to effectively identify individuals in need of vision care. In some cases, vision screening may actually serve as an unnecessary barrier to an early diagnosis of vision problems. They can create a false sense of security for those individuals who “pass” the screening, but who actually have a vision problem, thereby delaying further examination and treatment. Undetected and untreated vision problems can interfere with a child’s ability to learn in school and participation in sports or with an adult’s ability to do their job or to drive safely. The earlier a vision problem is diagnosed and treated, the less it will impact an individual’s quality of life.

    • I have heard about blue light being a concern as well. Can you talk a little bit about this and what it means for protecting your eyes?

      Recently, the optical community has found that blue light can also cause long-term damage to the eye. It has been found that overexposure to blue light over time can lead to macular degeneration. To help protect our eyes from these rays, a new coating has been found to block out this blue light. Anti-reflective or anti-glare coating could be a term that is familiar to you. Labs have found a way for these features to block the blue rays coming from our handheld devices, computers, and fluorescent bulbs. This coating has several benefits and protecting our eyes from these harmful rays is one of them.

    • What causes myopia?

      Myopia is caused by a combination of heredity and environmental factors. Studies show that if we can move the focal point in front of the mid-peripheral retina we can slow the progression of myopia. The increased use of cell phones and computers, as well as less time outdoors, is probably a contributing factor.

    • Do I need an optometrist or an ophthalmologist?

      Both are eye doctors that diagnose and treat many of the same eye conditions. The American Optometric Association defines Doctors of Optometry as: primary health care professionals who examine, diagnose, treat and manage diseases and disorders of the visual system, the eye and associated structures as well as diagnose related systemic conditions. They prescribe glasses, contact lenses, low vision rehabilitation, vision therapy and medications as well as perform certain surgical procedures. The main difference between the two, is that ophthalmologists perform surgery, where an optometrist would not, preferring to specialize in eye examinations, as well as eyeglass and contact lens-related services. Optometrists would be involved in all of the pre-and post-operative care of these surgical patients; collecting accurate data, educating the patient, and insuring proper healing after the procedure. An ophthalmologist is more of a medical-related specialist, who would need only to be involved if some kind of surgery were being considered. An optometrist can treat most any eye conditions, including the use of topical or oral medications if needed. This might include the treatment of glaucoma, eye infections, allergic eye conditions, dry eyes and others, to name just a few. A third “O” that often is overlooked is the optician. An optician is not a doctor, and they cannot examine your eye under their own license. However, a highly trained optician plays an indispensable role in the most successful eye doctor’s offices. An optician most often handles the optical, contact lens, and glasses side of things. Based on their vast knowledge of lenses, lens technology and frames, they manufacture eyeglasses, as well as assist in the selection of eyewear based on the requirements of each individual patient.’

Diabetes and the Eye

Diabetes is a disease that affects the body’s ability to control blood sugar. Too much blood sugar in the body can affect many parts of the body, such as the eyes, heart, kidneys, and blood vessels. The Center of Disease Control (CDC) claims that 90% of vision loss from diabetes can be prevented. Therefore, it is critical that if you or a loved one has diabetes, that they come for an annual eye exam.

How does diabetes affect your sight? Uncontrolled blood sugar can make shifts in your glasses prescription, cause cataracts, cause diabetic retinopathy with or without macula edema, and possibly cause glaucoma. The endpoint is blindness if not monitored or controlled. If there are signs of diabetes in the eye, the severity of damage will determine whether you will be monitored more closely or referred to a retinal specialist.

You can expect the doctor will recommend dilation of the eyes with drops to get better views of the retina.

There is more to the eye than just glasses and contact lenses.

You may not know it, but when you see an optometrist or an ophthalmologist, we are not only measuring the prescription of your eyes, but we are also checking the health of your eyes. Many times, the health of the eyes tells us about your health too. There are a variety of eye diseases that are both silent but could cause harm to your vision over time. The following is just an overview of diseases that can be unnoticed.

  • Glaucoma- Glaucoma is a progressive eye disease that does not have any symptoms most of the time. A person with glaucoma will lose vision mostly peripherally. As eye care professionals, we take a look at risk factors, such as your eye pressures, family history, medical history, and the appearance of your optic nerves and retinal fiber layers to assess if you are at risk for glaucoma. Without a proper complete eye exam, you won’t be able to detect glaucoma. Additional testing is needed to determine the loss of vision, and treatments can include eye drops and possibly other surgical procedures to lower the pressure of the eyes.
  • Diabetes- If you have diabetes, it is recommended that you have a complete eye examination with dilation once a year to ensure you do not have diabetic retinopathy. Diabetes is one of the leading causes of blindness with greater risk when blood sugar is uncontrolled. Eat healthy, stay fit, and come see us for an annual eye examination.
  • Hypertension- High blood pressure can also be seen in the eyes. Many times, patients will come in for a routine check, only to find out their vessels have signs of hypertension that needs to be monitored by their PCP. If hypertension stays uncontrolled for awhile, there is risk of stroke and sometimes vision problems can also be seen.
  • Retinal holes, tears, or detachments- Having two eyes gives us depth perception but also two chances to see. If one eye is unable to see due to disease or a congenital anomaly, the brain may shut off the unclear vision and favor your mind to see through the good seeing eye. Because we have two eyes, eye diseases can also go unnoticed. A dilated eye exam or a retinal wide-view image map can help us detect these anomalies that may be unmatched by your own naked eye.

Come see us at Eyecare Boulevard. Dr. My Dinh is devoted to take care of your eyes, whether you have disease or if you need an annual check-up to make sure your eyes are healthy. We will check your glasses and/or contact lens prescription, too, to ensure you have obtain the healthiest and best vision possible.

Pink, Stinging Eyes?

Conjunctivitis, also called pink eye, is one of the most frequently seen eye diseases, especially in kids. It can be caused by viruses, bacteria or even allergies to pollen, chlorine in swimming pools, and ingredients in cosmetics, or other irritants, which touch the eyes. Some forms of conjunctivitis might be quite transmittable and quickly spread in school and at the office.

Conjunctivitis is seen when the conjunctiva, or thin transparent layer of tissue covering the white part of the eye, becomes inflamed. You can identify conjunctivitis if you notice eye redness, discharge, itching or swollen eyelids and a crusty discharge surrounding the eyes early in the day. Pink eye infections can be divided into three main types: viral, allergic and bacterial conjunctivitis.

The viral type is usually a result of a similar virus to that which produces the recognizable red, watery eyes, sore throat and runny nose of the common cold. The red, itchy, watery eyes caused by viral pink eye are likely to last from a week to two and then will clear up on their own. You may however, be able to reduce some of the discomfort by using soothing drops or compresses. Viral pink eye is transmittable until it is completely cleared up, so in the meantime maintain excellent hygiene, remove eye discharge and try to avoid using communal pillowcases or towels. If your son or daughter has viral conjunctivitis, he or she will have to be kept home from school for three days to a week until symptoms disappear.

A bacterial infection such as Staphylococcus or Streptococcus is usually treated with antibiotic eye drops or cream. One should notice an improvement within just a few days of antibiotic drops, but be sure to adhere to the full prescription dosage to prevent pink eye from recurring.

Allergic pink eye is not contagious. It is usually a result of a known allergy such as hay fever or pet allergies that sets off an allergic reaction in their eyes. First of all, to treat allergic pink eye, you should eliminate the irritant. Use cool compresses and artificial tears to relieve discomfort in mild cases. When the infection is more severe, your eye doctor might prescribe a medication such as an anti-inflammatory or antihistamine. In cases of chronic allergic pink eye, topical steroid eye drops could be used.

Pink eye should always be diagnosed by a qualified eye doctor in order to identify the type and best course of treatment. Never treat yourself! Keep in mind the sooner you begin treatment, the lower chance you have of giving pink eye to loved ones or prolonging your discomfort.

 

Welcome to our New Website

We invite you to take a look around our new site to get to know our practice and learn about eye and vision health. You will find a wealth of information about our optometrists, our staff and our services, as well as facts and advice about how to take care of your eyes and protect your vision.

Learn about our Practice specialties including comprehensive eye exams, contact lens fittings and the treatment of eye diseases. Our website also offers you a convenient way to find our hours, address and map, schedule an appointment online, order contact lenses or contact us to ask us any questions you have about eye care and our Practice.

Have a look around our online office and schedule a visit to meet us in person. We are here to partner with you and your family for a lifetime of healthy eyes and vision. We look forward to seeing you!